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  1. #21
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    a meritat sa-mi pierd cateva minute din viata cu pozele astea

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    10 Most Fascinating Mazes


    Longleat Hedge Maze (UK)



    Made up of more than 16,000 english yews, Longleat’s spectacular hedge maze --the world’s longest-- was first laid out in 1975 by designer Greg Bright. The Maze covers an area of around 1.48 acres (0.6 hectares) with a total pathway length of 1.69 miles (2.72 kilometres). Unlike most other conventional mazes, it’s actually three-dimensional, with six wooden bridges offering tantalizing glimpses towards the elusive centre of the maze, which is marked by an observation tower for visitors who manage to find it.


    Reignac-sur-Indre Maze (France)



    In 1996, the year this plant maze --the world's largest-- was created at Reignac-sur-Indre in Touraine, 85,000 visitors came to admire and lose themselves in the middle of its 4-hectare (10-acre) expanse. Each year, a maze of corn or sunflowers emerges from the ground over the summer, is harvested in the autumn, and then reappears the following year in a different form, thanks to a well-proven technique of sowing and marking out.


    York Maze, a Star Trek tribute (UK)




    Containing 1.5 million individual plants, this maze --just outside York-- covers 32 acres, the equivalent of 15 football pitches, and was designed using satellite technology, which meant the paths could be cut to an accuracy of half a metre. The huge maze was created by Tom Pearcy as a tribute to the 40th anniversary of Star Trek.



    Ashcombe Maze (Australia)



    Ashcombe Maze is Australia’s oldest and most famous traditional hedge maze, located at Shoreham on the east of the Mornington Peninsula, Victoria. Measuring three meters high by two meters wide, the gardens also boast the world’s oldest rose maze, which blooms 217 varieties of roses on 1,200 bushes.


    Pineapple Garden Maze (Hawaii)



    World’s largest maze, according to the Guinness Book of Records 2001, the Pineapple Garden Maze offers over three miles of paths on three acres. Instead of a traditional English hedge, it is planted with 14,000 colorful Hawaiian plants, including hibiscus, croton, panax, pineapple and heliconia. It is located in Waimea Bay, Hawaii at Dole Plantation and certainly looks scary from the air.


    Snake Maze (UK)



    Michael Blee, 62, spent several months creating this six-acre maze at Gore Farm in Upchurch, near Rochester, Kent. Its hedges stand 9ft tall. This is the 10th and the most complicated maze Mr. Blee has ever done. He is hoping his giant game makes it into the Guinness Book of Records.


    Il Labirinto (Italy)



    Created in the early 1700s, Il Labirinto is said to be one of the most complicated labyrinths in the world. Located in the town of Stra, just outside Venice on the grounds of Villa Pisani, the legend says Napoleon got "lost" in it around 1807.


    Peace Maze (Ireland)



    This Irish maze was officially opened in 2001. The largest permanent hedge maze in the world, it covers an area of 11,000m2 --2.7 acres, or, 1.1 hectares. The path length is 3147m (2 miles or 3443 yards). The hedge is constructed from 6000 yew trees, many of which were planted during December 2000 by people from all over Northern Ireland.


    Hampton Court Maze (UK)



    The Maze at Hampton Court, the royal palace on the Thames to the west of London, is probably UK's most famous one. Planted as part of the gardens laid out for William of Orange between 1689 and 1695 by George London and Henry Wise, it covers an area of a third of an acre (about 1350 sq meters), with paths of over half a mile (0.8 km) long. It was described with great wit in Jerome K. Jerome's novel 'Three Men in a Boat.' Hampton Court Maze continues to attract hundreds of thousands of visitors each year.


    Davis' Mega Maze (USA)



    Davis' Mega Maze in Sterling, Massachusetts, has been a popular seasonal attraction since 1998. Davis' Farmland, a seventh-generation family-owned farm, holds this unique maze that changes completely from year to year. Designed in Dorset, England, by maze designer Adrian Fisher who is often credited with creating the modern maize maze craze, the Mega Maze takes more than 12,800 labor hours to be created each year.


  3. #23

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    Multumim Dytzu,sunt chiar minunate te lasa fara cuvinte.
    Dar sa stii ca la drumuri daca cauti bine gasesti pe la noi cateva cu mult mai periculoase

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    10 Geological Wonders you didn’t know


    The Wave (between Arizona and Utah - USA)



    A red-rock stunner on the border of Arizona and Utah, The Wave is made of 190-million-year-old sand dunes that have turned to rock. This little-known formation is accessible only on foot via a three-mile hike and highly regulated.


    Antelope Canyon (Arizona - USA)



    The most visited and photographed slot canyon in the American Southwest, the Antelope Canyon is located on Navajo land near Page, Arizona. It includes two separate, photogenic slot canyon sections, referred to individually as Upper Antelope Canyon --or “The Crack”-- and Lower Antelope Canyon --or “The Corkscrew.”

    The Navajo name for Upper Antelope Canyon is Tse' bighanilini, which means "the place where water runs through rocks." Lower Antelope Canyon is Hasdestwazi, or "spiral rock arches." Both are located within the LeChee Chapter of the Navajo Nation.


    Great Blue Hole (Belize)



    Part of the Lighthouse Reef System, The Great Blue Hole lies approximately 60 miles off the mainland out of Belize City. A large, almost perfectly circular hole approximately one quarter of a mile (0.4 km) across, it’s one of the most astounding dive sites to be found anywhere on earth. Inside this hole, the water is 480 feet (145 m) deep and it is the depth of water which gives the deep blue color that causes such structures throughout the world to be known as "blue holes."


    Crystal Cave of the Giants (Mexico)



    Found deep inside a mine in southern Chihuahua Mexico, these crystals were formed in a natural cave totally enclosed in bedrock. A geode full of spectacular crystals as tall as pine trees, and in some cases greater in circumference, they are a translucent gold and silver in color and come in many incredible forms and shapes. The Crystal Cave of the Giants was discovered within the same limestone body that hosts the silver-zinc-lead ore bodies exploited by the mine and it was probably dissolved by the same hydrothermal fluids that deposited the metals with the gypsum being crystallized during the waning stages of mineralization.


    Eye of the Sahara (Mauritania)



    This spectacular landform in Mauritania in the southwestern part of the Sahara desert is so huge with a diameter of 30 miles that it is visible from space. Called Richat Structure --or the Eye of the Sahara-- the The formation was originally thought to be caused by a meteorite impact but now geologists believe it is a product of uplift and erosion. The cause of its circular shape is still a mystery.


    Blue Lake Cave (Brazil)



    Mato Grosso do Sul region in Brazil (and especially the quiet town of Bonito) boasts many marvelous underground lakes: Gruta do Lago Azul, Gruta do Mimoso, Aquário Natural. The world famous "Gruta do Lago Azul” (Blue Lake Cave) is a natural monument whose interior is formed by stalactites, stalagmites and a huge and wonderful blue lake. The beauty of the lake is something impressive. The Blue Lake Cave has a big variety of geological formation but impresses mainly for the deep blue colored water of its inside lake.


    Giants Causeway (Ireland)



    An area of about 40,000 interlocking basalt columns, the Giants Causeway is a result of an ancient volcanic eruption. Located on the north-east coast of Northern Ireland, most of its columns are hexagonal, although there are also some with four, five, seven and eight sides. The tallest are about 12 meters (36 ft) high, and the solidified lava in the cliffs is 28 meters thick in places. In a 2005 poll of Radio Times readers, the causeway was named as the fourth greatest natural wonder in the United Kingdom.


    Hell Gate (Uzbekistan)



    Called by locals The Door to Hell, this place in Uzbekistan is situated near the small town of Darvaz. When geologists were drilling for gas, 35 years ago, they suddenly found an underground cavern that was so big, all the drilling site with all the equipment and camps got deep deep under the ground. None dared to go down there because the cavern was filled with gas, so they ignited it so that no poisonous gas could come out of the hole, and since then, it has been burning. Nobody knows how many tons of excellent gas has been burned for all those years but it just seems to be infinite.


    Wave Rock (Australia)



    The Wave Rock is a natural rock formation located in western Australia. It derives its name from the fact that it is shaped like a tall breaking ocean wave. The total outcrop covers several hectares; the "wave" part of the rock is about 15 meters high and approximately 110 meters long. One aspect of Wave Rock rarely shown on photographs is the retaining wall about halfway up the rock. This follows the contours and allows rainwater to be collected in a dam. It was constructed in 1951 by the Public Works Department, and such walls are common on many similar rocks in the wheatbelt.


    Chocolate Hills (Philippines)



    Composed of around 1,268 perfectly cone-shaped hills of about the same size spread over an area of more than 50 square kilometres (20 sq mi), this highly unusual geological formation, called Chocolate Hills, is located in Bohol, Philippines. There are a number of hypotheses regarding the formation of the hills. These include simple limestone weathering, sub-oceanic volcanism, the uplift of the seafloor and a more recent theory which maintains that as an ancient active volcano self-destructed, it spewed huge blocks of stone which were then covered with limestone and later thrust forth from the ocean bed.

    ---------- Post added at 12:26 PM ---------- Previous post was at 12:25 PM ----------

    Quote Originally Posted by spy View Post
    a meritat sa-mi pierd cateva minute din viata cu pozele astea
    Incercati si sa cititi nu sa va uitati numai la poze )
    Sunt informatii foarte interesante...


  5. #25
    Torrents.ro Member spy's Avatar
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    am si citit,stai linistit (sunt informatii interesante care merita asimilate).

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    7 Most Fascinating Hot Springs on Earth


    Produced by the emergence of heated groundwater from the earth's crust, they are located all over the earth, on every continent and even under the oceans and seas. Many were created between 20 and 45 million years ago as a result of violent volcanic activity, and can reach up to 350°C (662°F). Meet some of the most fascinating Hot Spring on planet earth.


    The Grand Prismatic Spring: America's largest



    America's largest hot spring and third largest in the world, the Grand Prismatic Spring in Yellowstone National Park is about 250 by 300 feet (75 by 91 meters) in size and 160 feet (49 meters) deep, discharging an estimated 560 gallons (2000 liters) of 160°F (71°C) water/minute. The vivid colors in the spring ranging from green to brilliant red and orange are the result of algae and pigmented bacteria in the microbial mats that grow around the edges of the mineral-rich water, the amount of color dependant on the ratio of chlorophyll to carotenoids produced by the organisms. The center of the pool is sterile due to extreme heat.


    Mammoth Hot Springs: largest carbonate-depositing spring in the world



    Also at Yellowstone, the Mammoth Hot Springs is the largest known carbonate-depositing spring in the world. The most famous feature at the springs is the Minerva Terrace — a series of travertine terraces which have been created over thousands of years as hot water from the spring cooled and deposited calcium carbonate. Over 2 tons flows into Mammoth each day in a solution.


    Blood Pond Hot Spring: welcome to hell



    Blood Pond Hot Spring is one of the "hells" (jigoku) of Beppu, Japan, nine spectacular natural hot springs that are more for viewing rather than bathing. The “blood pond hell” features a pond of hot, red water, colored as such by iron in the waters. It’s allegedly the most photogenic of the nine hells.


    Blue Lagoon: Iceland's geothermal spa



    The Blue Lagoon geothermal spa is one of the largest attractions in Iceland. The steamy waters are part of a lava formation, and a large swimming pool is heated with the run-off water from a nearby geothermal power plant. Superheated water is vented from the ground near a lava flow and used to run turbines that generate electricity. After passing through the turbines the steam and hot water passes through a heat exchanger to provide heat for a municipal hot water heating system. The water is then fed into the lagoon for users to bathe in. The warm waters are rich in minerals such as silica and sulfur. Bathing in the Blue Lagoon for therapeutic purposes is reputed to help some people suffering from skin diseases such as psoriasis. The water temperature in the bathing and swimming area of the lagoon averages 40°C (104°F). The spa is located in a lava field in Grindavík on the Reykjanes Peninsula, southwestern Iceland. It’s situated about 24 miles (39 kilometers) from the capital city of Reykjavík.


    Glenwood Springs: world’s largest natural hot springs swimming pool



    Glenwood Springs in Colorado, USA, has the world’s largest natural hot springs swimming pool with a flow rate of 143 liters/second. You can soak in the therapy pool full of salty minerals at 104°F (40°C), or swim in the huge 98°F (36°C) swimming pool.


    Jigokudani Hot Springs: home to the japanese Snow Monkeys



    The Jigokudani Hot Springs in Nagano Prefecture, Japan is most famous for its so called “snow monkeys” — wild Japanese monkeys enjoying the naturally hot waters alongside the human visitors. More than one hundred Macaques --Japan's indigenous monkeys-- live in the Jigokudani Monkey Park, located in a valley called the "Hell Valley" for the volcanic activities observed there.


    Deildartunguhver: highest flow hot spring in Europe



    This hotspring in Reykholtsdalur, Iceland, is characterized by a very high flow rate for a hot spring (180 liters/second) and water emerges at 97 °C, the highest flow hot spring in Europe. Some of the water is used for heating, being piped 34 kilometers to Borgarnes and 64 kilometers to Akranes.


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    Atatea locuri incredibil de frumoase si interesante in lumea asta si din pacate nu-ti ajunge o viata sa le vizitezi.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Solaris9 View Post
    Atatea locuri incredibil de frumoase si interesante in lumea asta si din pacate nu-ti ajunge o viata sa le vizitezi.
    Cred ca ar ajunge o viata sa le vizitezi si de doua ori, trebuie doar sa castigi la loto de tanar si sa nu vrei sa faci decat asta.

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    10 Most Unique Churches


    Harajuku: Japanese Futuristic Church



    This futuristic protestant church is located in Tokyo and it was first unveiled by the design firm of Ciel Rouge Creation in 2005. The ceiling is specially made to reverberate natural sound for 2 seconds to provide a unique listening experience for worshipers and tourists.


    Saint Basil's Cathedral: The Red Square's Colorful Church



    The St. Basil's Cathedral is located on the Red Square in Moscow, Russia. A Russian Orthodox church, the Cathedral sports a series of colorful bulbous domes that taper to a point, aptly named onion domes, that are part of Moscow’s Kremlin skyline.

    The cathedral was commissioned by Ivan the Terrible to commemorate the capture of the Khanate of Kazan. In 1588 Tsar Fedor Ivanovich had a chapel added on the eastern side above the grave of Basil Fool for Christ, a Russian Orthodox saint after whom the cathedral was popularly named.


    Hallgrímskirkja: Iceland's Most Amazing Church



    The Hallgrímskirkja (literally, the church of Hallgrímur) is a Lutheran parish church located in Reykjavík, Iceland. At 74.5 metres (244 ft), it is the fourth tallest architectural structure in Iceland. The church is named after the Icelandic poet and clergyman Hallgrímur Pétursson (1614 to 1674), author of the Passion Hymns. State Architect Guðjón Samúelsson's design of the church was commissioned in 1937; it took 38 years to build it.


    Temppeliaukio Kirkko: The Rock Church



    The Temppeliaukio Kirkko (Rock Church) is a thrilling work of modern architecture in Helsinki. Completed in 1952, it is built entirely underground and has a ceiling made of copper wire. It was designed by architect brothers Timo and Tuomo Suomalainen and completed in 1969. They chose a rocky outcrop rising about 40 feet above street level, and blasted out the walls from the inside. It is one of the most popular tourist attractions in Helsinki and frequently full of visitors.


    Cathedral of Brasília: The Modern Church of architect Oscar Niemeyer



    The Catedral Metropolitana Nossa Senhora Aparecida in the capital of Brazil is an expression of the architect Oscar Niemeyer. This concrete-framed hyperboloid structure, seems with its glass roof to be reaching up, open, to heaven. On 31 May 1970, the Cathedral’s structure was finished, and only the 70 m diameter of the circular area were visible. Niemeyer's project of Cathedral of Brasília is based in the hyperboloid of revolution which sections are asymmetric. The hyperboloid structure itself is a result of 16 identical assembled concrete columns. These columns, having hyperbolic section and weighing 90 t, represent two hands moving upwards to heaven. The Cathedral was dedicated on 31 May 1970.


    Borgund Church: Best Preserved Stave Church



    The Borgund Stave Church in Lærdal is the best preserved of Norway’s 28 extant stave churches. This wooden church, probably built in the end of the 12th century, has not changed structure or had a major reconstruction since the date it was built. The church is also featured as a Wonder for the Viking civilization in the video game Age of Empires II: The Age of Kings.


    Las Lajas Cathedral: A Gothic Church Worthy of a Fairy Tale



    The Las Lajas Cathedral is located in southern Colombia and built in 1916 inside the canyon of the Guaitara River. According to the legend, this was the place where an indian woman named María Mueses de Quiñones was carrying her deaf-mute daughter Rosa on her back near Las Lajas ("The Rocks"). Weary of the climb, the María sat down on a rock when Rosa spoke (for the first time) about an apparition in a cave.

    Later on, a mysterious painting of the Virgin Mary carrying a baby was discovered on the wall of the cave. Supposedly, studies of the painting showed no proof of paint or pigments on the rock - instead, when a core sample was taken, it was found that the colors were impregnated in the rock itself to a depth of several feet. Whether true or not, the legend spurred the building of this amazing church.


    St. Joseph Church: Known for its Thirteen Gold Domed Roof



    The St. Joseph The Betrothed is an Ukrainian Greek-Catholic Church in Chicago. Built in 1956, it is most known for its ultra-modern thirteen gold domed roof symbolizing the twelve apostles and Jesus Christ as the largest center dome. The interior of the church is completely adorned with byzantine style icons (frescoes). Unfortunately the iconographer was deported back to his homeland before he was able to write the names of all the saints as prescribed by iconographic traditions.


    Ružica Church: Where Chandeliers are made of Bullet Shells




    Located over the Kalemegdan Fortress in Belgrade, Serbia, the Ružica Church is a small chapel decorated with... with trench art! Its chandeliers are entirely made of spent bullet casing, swords, and cannon parts.

    The space the church now occupies was used by the Turks as gunpowder storage for over 100 years and it had to be largely rebuilt in 1920 after WWI. Though damaged by bombings there was an upshot to the terrible carnage of The Great War. While fighting alongside England and the US, Serbian soldiers on the Thessaloniki front took the time to put together these amazing chandeliers. It is one of the world's finest examples of trench art.


    Chapel of St-Gildas: Built into the base of a bare rocky cliff



    The Chapel of St-Gildas sits upon the bank of the Canal du Blavet in Brittany, France. Built like a stone barn into the base of a bare rocky cliff, this was once a holy place of the Druids. Gildas appears to have travelled widely throughout the Celtic world of Corwall, Wales, Ireland and Scotland. He arrived in Brittany in about AD 540 and is said to have preached Christianity to the people from a rough pulpit, now contained within the chapel.


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    10 Most Unique Lakes of our World


    Plitvice Lakes (Croatia): Sixteen Lakes interconnected by Spectacular Waterfalls



    The Plitvice Lakes are a series of sixteen lakes interconnected by spectacular waterfalls, set in a deep woodland and populated by deers, bears, wolves, boars and rare bird species. A UNESCO World Heritage Site, the lakes are renowned for their distinctive colours, ranging from azure to green, grey or blue. The colours change constantly depending on the quantity of minerals or organisms in the water and the angle of sunlight.


    Boiling Lake (Dominica): A Flooded Fumarole



    The Boiling Lake is situated in the Morne Trois Pitons National Park, Dominica's World Heritage site. It is a flooded fumarole, or hole in the earth’s surface, 10.5 km east of Roseau, Dominica, on the Caribbean. It is filled with bubbling greyish-blue water that is usually enveloped in a cloud of vapor. The lake is approximately 60 m across.


    Red Lagoon (Bolivia): Red (algae) + White (borax)



    The Laguna Colorada (Red Lagoon) is a shallow salt lake in the southwest of the altiplano of Bolivia, close to the border with Chile. The lake contains borax islands, whose white color contrasts nicely with the reddish color of its waters, caused by red sediments and pigmentation of some algae.


    Five-Flower Lake (China): Beautiful Multi-Coloured Lake with Fallen Tree Trunks



    The Wuhua Hai, or Five-Flower Lake, is the signature of the Jiuzhaigon National Park in China. The lake is a shallow multi-coloured lake whose bottom is littered with fallen tree trunks. The water is so clear that you can see the trunks clearly. The water comes in different shares of turquoise, from yellowish to green, to blue. It is located at an elevation of 2472 meters, below Panda Lake and above the Pearl Shoal Waterfall.


    Dead Sea (Israel and Jordan): Lowest Point on Earth



    The Dead Sea is a salt lake situated between Israel and the West bank to the west, and Jordan to the east. It is 420 meters (1,378 ft) below sea level and its shores are the lowest point on the surface of the Earth on dry land. The Dead Sea is 330 m (1,083 ft) deep, the deepest hypersaline lake in the world. It is also the world's second saltiest body of water, after Lake Assal in Djibouti, with 30 percent salinity. It is 8.6 times saltier than the ocean. This salinity makes for a harsh environment where animals cannot flourish and boats cannot sail. The Dead Sea is 67 kilometers (42 mi) long and 18 kilometers (11 mi) wide at its widest point. It lies in the Jordan Rift Valley, and its main tributary is the Jordan River.

    The Dead Sea has attracted visitors from around the Mediterranean basin for thousands of years. Biblically, it was a place of refuge for King David. It was one of the world's first health resorts (for Herod the Great), and it has been the supplier of a wide variety of products, from balms for Egyptian mummification to potash for fertilizers.


    Lake Baikal (Russia): Deepest and Oldest Lake in the World




    Lake Baikal is located in Southern Siberia in Russia, and it's also known as the "Blue Eye of Siberia". It contains more water than all the North American Great Lakes combined. At 1,637 meters (5,371 ft), Lake Baikal is the deepest lake in the world, and the largest freshwater lake in the world by volume, holding approximately twenty percent of the world's total fresh water. However, Lake Baikal contains less than one third the amount of water as the Caspian Sea which is the largest lake in the world. Lake Baikal was formed in an ancient rift valley and therefore is long and crescent-shaped with a surface area (31,500 km²) slightly less than that of Lake Superior or Lake Victoria. Baikal is home to more than 1,700 species of plants and animals, two thirds of which can be found nowhere else in the world and was declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1996. At more than 25 million years old, it is the oldest lake in the world.


    Lake Titicaca (Bolivia and Peru): World's Highest Navigable Lake



    Lake Titicaca is a lake located on the border of Bolivia and Peru. It sits 3,812 m (12,500 ft) above sea level making it the highest commercially navigable lake in the world. By volume of water it is also the largest lake in South America. Lake Titicaca is fed by rainfall and meltwater from glaciers on the sierras that abut the Altiplano.


    Caspian Sea (Russia): World's Largest Lake



    The Caspian Sea is the world's largest lake or largest inland body of water in the world, and accounts for 40 to 44 percent of the total lacustrine waters of the world. With a surface area of 394,299 km² (152,240 mi²), it has a surface area greater than the next six largest lakes combined.


    Crater Lake (USA): its waters are considered one of the World's Most Clearest



    Crater Lake is a caldera lake located in Oregon; due to several unique factors, most prominently that it has no inlets or tributaries, the waters of Crater Lake are considered one of the world's most clearest. The lake partly fills a nearly 4,000 foot (1,220 m) deep caldera that was formed around 5,677 (± 150) BC by the collapse of the volcano Mount Mazama. Its deepest point has been measured at 1,949 feet (594 m) deep, making it the deepest lake in the United States, and the ninth deepest in the world.


    Lake Karachay (Russia): Most Polluted Spot on Earth



    Lake Karachay is a small lake in the southern Ural mountains in western Russia. Starting in 1951 the Soviet Union used Karachay as a dumping site for radioactive waste from Mayak, the nearby nuclear waste storage and reprocessing facility, located near the town of Ozyorsk. According to a report by the Washington, D.C.-based Worldwatch Institute on nuclear waste, Karachay is the "most polluted spot" on Earth. The lake accumulated some 4.44 exabecquerels (EBq) of radioactivity, including 3.6 EBq of Caesium-137 and 0.74 EBq of Strontium-90. For comparison, the Chernobyl disaster released from 5 to 12 EBq of radioactivity, however this radiation is not concentrated in one location.


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    Moooma ce tare, SUPERB Dytzu. Ce pot sa zic, interesante alea cu locuinte la inaltime, hmm ... oare cum o fi sa iesi seara din casa sa te usurezi si din greseala sa o iei pe usa din spate ... hmm ...

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    10 Most Breathtaking Fountains in the World


    Bellagio Fountains (Las Vegas): A Choreographed Water Show

    The Fountains of the Bellagio Hotel in Las Vegas (USA) are a vast, choreographed water fountains with performances set to light and music. The performances are visible from numerous vantage points on the Strip, both from the street and from neighboring structures. The fountain's show takes place every 30 minutes in the afternoons and early evenings, and every 15 minutes from 8 PM to midnight. The Fountains are set in a nine-acre man-made lake. The fountain display is choreographed to various pieces of music; current pieces include "Fly Me To The Moon" (Frank Sinatra), "Time to Say Goodbye" (Sarah Brightman and Andrea Bocelli) and "My Heart Will Go On" (Celine Dion).



    Contrary to a common urban myth that the lake is filled with treated greywater from the hotel, it is actually serviced by a fresh water well, that was drilled decades prior to irrigate a golf course which previously utilized the site. In fact, the fountains use less water at present than under its prior golf course use. They incorporate a network of underwater pipes with over 1,200 nozzles that makes it possible to stage fountain displays coordinated with over 4,500 lights. It is estimated that the fountains cost US$50 million to build.


    Fountain of Wealth (Suntec): World's Largest Fountain



    The Fountain of Wealth is located underground within the largest shopping mall of Suntec City in Singapore and is famous for being the world's largest fountain. A symbol of wealth and life, the Fountain's design was based on the Hindu mandala, and is a symbolic representation of the oneness in spirit, unity and harmony among the four races in Singapore. The fountain is made of bronze, and consists of a circular ring with a circumference of 66 metres supported on four large slanted columns. It occupies an area of 1683 metres (5521 ft), with a height of 13.8m (45.2 ft). Water from the fountain shoots up to 30 metres high.


    Magic Fountain of Montjuic (Barcelona): A spectacular display of colour, light and motion



    The Magic Fountain of Montjuic is a spectacular display of colour, light, motion, music and water acrobatics in Barcelona. Located between Placa d’Espanya and the National Palau, the magic fountain attracts thousands of tourists every night. Built by designer Carles Buigas in 1929 for the Great Universal Exhibition, over 3000 workers were commissioned to work on the project for less than a year.


    Volcano Fountain (Abu Dhabi): Forever Lost



    Sadly, on 2004 the Volcano Fountain --once an scenic landmark of Abu Dhabi and one of the world's most beautiful fountains-- was demolished to make space for a more picturesque development of the neighborhood. The 80-foot-high fountain was built like a circular pyramid, with a flight of steps from the four sides going up the six platforms to the fountain on the top. On the evenings, the fountain would turn into a pleasant spectacle with coloured lights on as the water cascades down.


    Big Wild Goose Pagoda Fountains (Xian): Around Emperor Gaozong's Pagoda




    Originally built in 652 during the reign of Emperor Gaozong of the Tang Dynasty, the Big Wild Goose Pagoda is a well-preserved ancient building and a holy place for Buddhists. Located in the southern suburb of Xian City (China), the fountain is home to the largest musical fountain in Asia, with the longest light-belt in the world.


    People’s Friendship Fountain (Moscow): A Gilded USSR Fountain



    The People’s Friendship Fountain (also known as Friendship of Nations) on Moscow features 16 gilded statues of maidens in their national costumes, representing all the Soviet Union Republics. The fountain is framed by an octahedral bowl of red granite with a surface area of 4,000 square meters. The fountain is serviced by a complex system of eight powerful pumps that can shoot 1,200 liters of water from 800 jets to the height of 24 meters per second.


    Trevi Fountain (Rome): World's Most Famous Fountain



    Standing 25.9 meters (85 feet) high and 19.8 meters (65 feet) wide, the Trevi Fountain (Fontana di Trevi) features one of Italy's most beautiful sculptures: Neptune or Oceanus in the middle and two tritons, one trying to tame a fiery horse symbolizing the rough sea, and one blowing a shell-horn symbolizing the quiet sea. It was ordered in 1732 by Clemens XII and thirty years later his predecessor Clemens XIII christened it.

    Trevi became famous for a scene in Fellini's movie "La Dolce Vita", when Anita Ekberg takes a late-night bath in the fountain. There’s also a legend saying that, if you throw a coin into the Trevi Fountain, you will return to Rome.


    Oval Fountain (Tivoli): UNESCO world heritage site




    The Fontana dell'Ovato (Oval Fountain), also called Fontana di Tivoli, is located in Villa d'Este, Tivoli, Italy. The fountain cascades from its egg-shaped basin into a pool set against a rustic nymphaeum. The design was made by Pirro Ligorio. The whole Villa was declared a UNESCO world heritage site in 2001.


    Peterhof Fountain (Saint Petersburg): Along the Russian Versailles




    Peterhof is an immensely luxurious and beautifully preserved Imperial estate, founded in 1710 by Peter the Great on the shore of the Gulf of Finland (Baltic Sea). It combines several ornate palaces, a number of beautifully landscaped parks and a dazzling array of magnificent statues and fountains, lending it the epithet "The Russian Versailles". The Grand Cascade flows spectacularly from beneath the palace towards the Baltic Sea and is one of the largest fountain ensembles in the world. From the Grand Cascade's largest fountain, decorated with a magnificent gold statue of Samson battling with the lion, a channel flows through the park to the pier, where hydrofoils and boats from St. Petersburg dock.


    King Fahd’s Fountain (Jeddah): World's Tallest



    Located in the city of Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, the King Fahd’s Fountain is famous for being the highest fountain in the world, throwing water up to 1023-ft (312m) --that’s taller than the Eiffel Tower if you exclude the antenna. It uses 3 massive pumps that can deliver 625 litres of water per second at an amazing speed of 233 mph (375 km/h). Traveling to Jeddah, don’t forget to pay it a visit, it’s incredible.


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    Oddee.com - A Blog on Oddities: the odd, bizarre and strange things of our world!

    Un blog cu milioane de vizitatori zilnic, care prezinta cele mai spectaculoase, ciudate, iesite din comun locuri, lucruri, oameni, animale si multe, multe altele foarte interesante.

    Sper sa nu se enerveze Dytzu prea tare ca ma bag in topicul lui, dar acest blog este actualizat zilnic, sunt foarte multe categorii. Ceea ce a postat el este doar o bucatica din ce se posteaza pe acest blog, de aceea cred ca merita sa fie cunoscut de toata lumea de pe aici

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    De ce m-as supara? Ai dezvaluit sursa,doar nu iti inchipui ca cineva credea ca toate aceste lucruri vin de la mine din cap...
    Voi continua sa prezint ceea ce mi se pare mai interesant pt ca multi nu vor intra zilnic pe acel site ca sa vada ce a mai aparut si in felul acesta informatiile vor fi mai accesibile.

    Vezi initiativa lui helium care face acelasi lucru,iar munca lui este apreciata.

    Nu stiu de ce,dar parca postul tau are o tenta / nuanta de rautate )
    Last edited by Dytzu; 06-26-2009 at 07:04 PM.


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    nu te-ai suparat, dar sesizezi o tenta/nuanta de rautate.

    ai inteles gresit daca crezi ca m-a apucat invidia sau mai stiu eu ce, si m-a indemnat la un post rautacios. rautate pentru ce ? pur si simplu consider ca poate exista persoane care au timpul, placerea, dispozitia, curiozitatea sa citeasca mai mult, nu doar ce ai tu timp sa postezi, si mai ales ceea ce ti se pare tie mai interesant. cine vrea sa o faca poate sa intre pe site, cine nu poate sa arunce un ochi la ceea ce postezi tu aici. e alegerea fiecaruia.

    peace.

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    Quote Originally Posted by danyristea View Post
    poate exista persoane care au timpul, placerea, dispozitia, curiozitatea sa citeasca mai mult, nu doar ce ai tu timp sa postezi, si mai ales ceea ce ti se pare tie mai interesant. cine vrea sa o faca poate sa intre pe site, cine nu poate sa arunce un ochi la ceea ce postezi tu aici. e alegerea fiecaruia.

    Nu am condamnat lucrul asta,doar nu am pus restrictie pe siteul respectiv si am blocat accesul oamenilor acolo ca sa se uite doar la ce postez eu (nici nu as putea face chestia asta )

    Ai dreptate,poate am interpretat gresit postul tau...

    NU m-am suparat,a fost doar o remarca / o chestie de interpretare,imi pare rau ca nu am scris de la inceput sursa.



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    10 Most Amazing Bridges


    Banpo Bridge (South Korea): The Fountain Bridge



    On September 9, 2008, the Banpo Bridge in Seoul (South Korea) got a major facelift: a 10,000-nozzle fountain that runs all the way on both sides. Immediately after being installed, the bridge turned into a major tourist attraction, as the bridge pumps out 190 tons of water per minute using the water from the river below.


    Millau Bridge (France): World's Tallest Vehicular Bridge




    Towering 1,125-ft above the Tarn Valley in southern France, driving along the Millau Bridge is said to feel like flying. This Foster + Partners marvel is slightly taller than the Eiffel Tower, took three years to build and opened to the public in 2004. While it may provide picturesque views of the valley below, once the mist descends it is not a route for the faint hearted! The Millau Bridge has a total length of 8,071-ft with the longest single span at 1,122-ft and a maximum clearance below of 886-ft; in short the bridge is massively impressive both on paper and in real life. The deck is lofted on 7 pylons and weighs 36,000 tonnes. A series of 7 masts, each 292-ft tall and weighing 700 tonnes, are attached to the corresponding pylons.


    Henderson Waves (Singapore): Most Beautiful Pedestrian Bridge



    At a height of 36 metres or 12 storeys from the road, it is the highest pedestrian bridge in Singapore. The 300-metre bridge links up the parks at Mount Faber and Telok Blangah Hill.


    Hangzhou Bay Bridge (China): World's Longest Trans-Oceanic Bridge




    Across the Hangzhou Bay extends the longest trans-oceanic bridge in the world, with 35,673 kilometres (22 mi) long with six expressway lanes in two directions. The bridge was built to address traffic congestion in the booming region, cutting the driving time between Shanghai and Ningbo from four to two-and-a-half hours.



    The bridge underwent various feasibility studies for a decade before it was approved in 2003, and finally opened to the public on May 1, 2008. Total investment on the bridge was RMB 11.8 billion (around US$ 1.4 billion).


    Rolling Bridge (UK): The Bridge that Curls Up on Itself



    Designed by Heatherwick Studio, the award-winning Rolling Bridge is located Paddington Basin, London. Rather than a conventional opening bridge mechanism, consisting of a single rigid element that lifts to let boats pass, the Rolling Bridge gets out of the way by curling up until its two ends touch. While in its horizontal position, the bridge is a normal, inconspicuous steel and timber footbridge; fully open, it forms a circle on one bank of the water that bears little resemblance to its former self.

    Twelve metres long, the bridge is made in eight steel and timber sections, and is made to curl by hydraulic rams set into the handrail between each section.


    Oliveira Bridge (Brazil): World's First X-shaped Cable Stayed Bridge with two crossed lanes



    The Octavio Frias de Oliveira Bridge over the Pinheiros River in São Paulo, Brazil was opened in May 2008. It is 138 metres (450-ft) tall, and connects Marginal Pinheiros to Jornalista Roberto Marinho Avenue. Its design is unique in that the 2 curved decks of the bridge cross each other through its X-shaped supporting tower.


    Wind and Rain Bridge (China): Dong people's bridge



    The Wind and Rain Bridge is the symbolized architecture of the Dong minority people. The wind and rain bridge in Diping is the largest of its kind in Guizhou Province, where China's biggest Dong community lives. The bridge is over 50 meters long and it was first built in 1894 during the Qing Dynasty over 100 years ago. However, the original structure was destroyed in a big fire in 1959 and the one visitors see today was a recreation finished in 1964.

    It is a pure wooden architecture made up of pillars, purlins and balusters of different sizes and shapes. The body of the bridge is divided to three tiers, the largest one in the middle take the shape of a traditional Chinese drum tower. The pilasters and eaves of the bridge are engraved with flowers and patterns and are quite magnificent.


    Tower Bridge (UK): Most Famous and Beautiful Victorian Bridge



    Completed in 1894 and designed by Horace Jones and Wolfe Barry, Tower Bridge (so named after the two, striking, 141-ft high towers and the Tower of London close to it) is one of the most famous landmarks in London and one of the most beautiful in the world. The 800-ft long bridge has a 28-ft clearance when closed but raises in the centre to a maximum clearance of 140-ft that allows ships to pass down the Thames. Back in the days when goods were moved by sea instead of air the bridge was raised around 50 times daily. Tower Bridge took 432 workers 8 years to build. During that time they sank 70,000 tonnes of concrete into 2 huge piers, lowered 2 counterbalanced bascules into place each weighing 1,000 tonnes and then clad the whole bridge in Portland stone and Cornish granite to disguise the 11,000 tonnes of steel beneath.


    Magdeburg Water Bridge (Germany): Europe's Largest Water Bridge




    The Magdeburg Water Bridge connects the former East and West Germany over the Elbe River, and it was made as part of the unification project. 1 km long, the 500 million euros water bridge enables river barges to avoid a lengthy and sometimes unreliable passage along the Elbe. Shipping used to come to a halt on the stretch if the river’s water mark felt to unacceptably low levels.


    Ponte Vecchio (Italy): Oldest and Most Famous of its kind




    The Ponte Vecchio in Florence is one of the most famous tourist spots in Italy, and is thought to be the oldest wholly-stone built, segmental arch bridge in Europe, although there are many partial segments which date further back. It was originally built of wood until destroyed by floods in 1333, and twelve years later it was rebuilt using stone. Famous for its lining of shops, the bridge has housed everybody from Medieval merchants and butchers to souvenir stalls and art dealers.


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    10 Homes that Defy Gravity


    Wozoco Apartments (Amsterdam-Osdorp, Netherlands)



    A zoning law and blueprint flub were the inspiration for this apartment complex. Dutch housing regulations require apartment construction to provide a certain amount of daylight to their tenants–but MVRDV architects forgot to plan for that. Their solution? To hang thirteen of the 100 units off the north facade of the block. The ingenious design saves ground floor space and allows enough sunlight to enter the east or west facade.


    Floating Castle (Ukraine)



    Supported by a single cantilever --and quite discussed at Panoramio, this mysterious levitating farm house belongs in a sci-fi flick. It’s claimed to be an old bunker for the overload of mineral fertilizers but we’re sure there’s a better back story... alien architects probably had a hand in it.


    Habitat 67 (Montreal, Canada)



    Apartments connect and stack like Lego blocks in Montreal's Habitat 67. Without a traditional vertical construction, the apartments have the open space that most urban residences lack, including a separate patio for each apartment.


    Free Spirit Spheres (British Columbia, Canada)



    Free Spirit Spheres can be hung from the trees as shown, making a tree house. They can also be hung from any other solid objects or placed in cradles on the ground. There are four attachment points on the top of each sphere and another four anchor points on the bottom. Each of the attachment points is strong enough to carry the weight of the entire sphere and contents.

    The spheres are made of two laminations of wood strips over laminated wood frames. The outside surface is then finished and covered with a clear fibreglass. The result is a beautiful and very tough skin. The skin is waterproof and strong enough to take the impacts that come with life in a dynamic environment such as the forest.


    Cube House (Rotterdam, Netherlands)




    Living in a tilted house is much easier than it looks—just ask the people living in these the Kijk-Kubus homes. Architect Piet Blom tipped a conventional house forty-five degrees and rested it upon a hexagon-shaped pole so that three sides face down and the other three face the sky. Each of the cube houses accommodates three floors: a living space including a kitchen, study and bathroom, the middle floor houses bedrooms and the top is the pyramid room that can act like an attic or viewing deck. These houses are quite expensive, but you can satisfy your curiosity by visiting the museum show house.


    Gangster's House (Archangelsk, Russia)



    One-time Russian gangster Nikolai Sutyagin’s home is certainly unusual. The eccentric former convict’s seemingly accidental 15-year project begun in 1992 stands 13 floors, 144 feet high. He claims he was only intending to build a two-story house - larger than those of his neighbours to reflect his position as the city’s richest man.


    Mushroom House (Cincinnati, Ohio)



    So disparate in materials and shapes this hodgepodge house looks like its been welded and glued together. But this is no hobo-construction, it was designed by the professor of architecture and interior design at the University of Cincinnati, Terry Brown, and was recently on the market for an estimated $400K.

    Upside-Down House (Syzmbark, Poland)



    This upside down design seems totally nonsensical–but that is exactly the message the Polish philanthropist and designer, Daniel Czapiewski, was trying to send. The unstable and backward construction was built as a social commentary on Poland’s former Communist era. The monument is worth a trip be it for a lesson in history or balance.


    Pod House (New Rochelle, New York)



    We assumed this oddball home was UFO-inspired, but it turns out the weed Queen Anne’s lace is where it got it's roots. Its thin stems support pods with interconnecting walkways.


    Heliotrope Rotating House (Freiburg, Germany)



    Green to the extreme, Architect Rolf Disch built a solar powered home that rotates towards the warm sun in the winter and rotates back toward its well-insulated rear in the summer. A house that spins in circles doesn’t sound too stable to us, but for the environment it is worth the risk.


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    10 Most Awesome Tree Houses


    Too High Teahouse



    Completed in Spring, 2004, Terunobu Fujimori, a professor of architecture at the University of Tokyo, built his boyhood dream hideaway in Takasugi-an (Chino, Nagano), a teahouse on stilts, in the bottom of his father's garden. So said his father when he saw it: "There goes Terunobu, making something wacky again."


    World's Largest tree house



    The halcyon days of our youth where a few 2x4s pounded into an old elm with rusty nails constituted the coolest tree house on the block are not just long dead, but now embarrassingly overshadowed by the richest kid on the street, Lord Northumberland, and his World's Largest tree house.

    Located on the grounds of Alnwick Gardens just 95 miles south of Edinburgh (and next to the Alnwick Castle, the very one used in the Harry Potter films), this 6,000-square-foot tree house leviathan soars 56 feet above the ground and is connected with 4,000-square-feet of suspended walkways. It has a restaurant that seats 120 people as well as classrooms, cafes, turrets, wobbly bridges, and imported wood from all over the world. Oh, and it cost $7 million.


    Nescafé Treehouse



    This amazing treehouse above was designed by Takashi Kobayashi, one of japan's leading treehouse creators. This house was designed after an advertising agency in Tokyo, hired him to design a treehouse for a Nescafé commercial now running on Japanese television. Mr. Kobayashi built an oval bird's nest of a house, 12 feet high and 9 feet in diameter, reached by a circular staircase, and the final price for this tree house was about $38,000. The house is located on a field there owned by the town of Kamishihoro, where it remains an enticing, if off-limits, gift from Nestlé, the makers of Nescafé, to the people of Hokkaido.


    Free Spirit Spheres



    Free Spirit Spheres can be hung from the trees as shown, making a tree house. They can also be hung from any other solid objects or placed in cradles on the ground. There are four attachment points on the top of each sphere and another four anchor points on the bottom. Each of the attachment points is strong enough to carry the weight of the entire sphere and contents.

    The spheres are made of two laminations of wood strips over laminated wood frames. The outside surface is then finished and covered with a clear fibreglass. The result is a beautiful and very tough skin. The skin is waterproof and strong enough to take the impacts that come with life in a dynamic environment such as the forest.


    The Dome



    This geodesic dome perched in an olive tree uses natural pine, cork and clay for construction in a Spanish ecovillage. Like the Fab Tree Hab, this structure combines the general form of a geodesic dome with the sustainability of an earthship.


    O2 Treehouse



    Dustin Feider has a different vision for tree houses: one that would be good for the tree, the environment and the deep human need to reconnect with nature and our primordial roots. Through his company, O2 Treehouse, Feider is out to revolutionize not merely treehouses but the entire concept of habitat. All the materials used for the treehouse are entirely recycled - and while the original O2 Sustainability Treehouse is 13 feet wide, interiors and sizes can be customized according to customer specifications.


    TreeHouse Workshop



    The TreeHouse Workshop is a Seattle-based company that takes the art of constructing tree houses extremely seriously. They build an average of one tree house per month and hire extremely able builders and carpenters to construct their projects. Their finished works vary in luxury but some even include (counterintuitive!) fireplaces.


    4Treehouse



    The 4Treehouse by Lukasz Kos floats like a “Japanese lantern on stilts” and is situated to accommodate four existing trees on the site. As with the best tree house designs, this project successfully worked around the existing natural site conditions. The three-story house itself rents suspended from these four primary site trees.


    Le Lit Perché



    Alain Laurens, a former chairman of a major French advertising agency, left his position there in 1999 to found La Cabane Perchée, a Paris-based studio that designs and builds treehouses. The firm's projects are unusually elegant by treehouse standards, but none so much so as Le Lit Perché, a roomy 42-square-foot bed made from six segments of mattress perched on a red cedar platform within a railing of slender steel cables. Mr. Laurens, 59, built the first one in 2005, 24 feet above the ground at his own country house in Bonnieux, in the South of France, and has since built 12 more for customers. Le Lit Perché, which costs $15,000, “is for people to sleep in trees” without having to spend the money to build an entire treehouse, Mr. Laurens said. It features a pulley system that raises and lowers a basket that can be filled with food, wine or other supplies. For those who find being suspended in mid-air (or completely exposed to the elements) scary, and not conducive to romance, the bed can be placed as low as six feet off the ground.


    Everybody's Treehouse



    When Bill Allen builds treehouses, he does not look for the perfect tree, sturdy with thick, embracing limbs and an abundant canopy of leaves. Mr. Allen's nonprofit company, Forever Young Treehouses in Burlington, Vt., founded in 2002, designs its houses to be accessible to handicapped and chronically ill children, and “the first thing we look for is the ground dropping away” from the start of the access ramp, he said, so that the ramp doesn't need to climb too high to reach the house. He also likes to build in a grove of trees so the ramp can meander from tree to tree. Everybody's Treehouse, which cost $450,000 and which Mr. Allen completed in January in the Mount Airy Forest park in Cincinnati, is a typical Forever Young project. Its 160-foot ramp winds among 14 trees (red and white oaks, maples and ash) as it climbs 15 feet to a 2,000-square-foot house with two asymmetrical cedar-shingle roofs that give it a Hansel-and-Gretel look. The structure is made of tongue-and-groove pine boards with an ipê-wood deck and has eight windows; most start 32 inches from the floor, an ideal height for wheelchair occupants. “For a kid in a wheelchair,” Mr. Allen said, “it gives a different perspective of what the world looks like, of what a tree looks like, of what a forest looks like."


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    10 Most Amazing Ghost Towns


    KOLMANSKOP (Namibia): Buried in sand


    Kolmanskop is a ghost town in southern Namibia, a few kilometres inland from the port of Lüderitz. In 1908, Luederitz was plunged into diamond fever and people rushed into the Namib desert hoping to make an easy fortune. Within two years, a town, complete with a casino, school, hospital and exclusive residential buildings, was established in the barren sandy desert. But shortly after the drop in diamond sales after the First World War, the beginning of the end started. During the 1950's the town was deserted and the dunes began to reclaim what was always theirs.



    Soon the metal screens collapsed and the pretty gardens and tidy streets were buried under the sand. Doors and windows creaked on their hinges, cracked window panes stared sightlessly across the desert. A new ghost town had been born.





    A couple of old buildings are still standing and some interiors like the theatre is still in very good condition, but the rest are crumbling ruins demolished from grandeur to ghost houses.


    PRYPIAT (Ukraine): Chernobyl workers' home




    Prypiat is an abandoned city in the Zone of alienation in northern Ukraine. It was home to the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant workers, abandoned in 1986 following the Chernobyl disaster. Its population had been around 50,000 prior to the accident.





    Until recently, the site was practically a museum, documenting the late Soviet era. Apartment buildings (four of which were recent constructions not yet occupied), swimming pools, hospitals and other buildings were all abandoned, and everything inside the buildings was left behind, including records, papers, TVs, children's toys, furniture, valuables, and clothing, etc. that any normal family would have with them. Residents were only allowed to take away a suitcase full of documents, books and clothes that were not contaminated. However, many of the apartment buildings were almost completely looted some time around the beginning of the 21st century.[citation needed] Nothing of value was left behind; even toilet seats were taken away. Some buildings have remained untouched. Many of the building interiors have been vandalized and ransacked over the years. Because the buildings are not maintained, the roofs leak, and in the spring the rooms are flooded with water. It is not unusual to find trees growing on roofs and even inside buildings. This hastens deterioration, and due to this, a 4-story school partially collapsed in July of 2005.


    SAN ZHI (Taiwan): a futuristic resort



    In the North of Taiwan, this futuristic pod village was initially built as a luxury vacation retreat for the rich. However, after numerous fatal accidents during construction, production was halted. A combination of lack of money and lack of willingness meant that work was stopped permanently, and the alien like structures remain as if in remembrance of those lost. Indeed, rumors in the surrounding area suggest that the City is now haunted by the ghosts of those who died.



    After this the whole thing received the cover-up treatment. And the Government, who commissioned the site in the first place was keen to distance itself from the bizarre happenings. Thanks to this, there are no named architects. The project may never be restarted thanks to the growing legend, and there would be no value in re-developing the area for other purpose. Maybe simply because destroying homes of lonely spirits is a bad thing to do. San Zhi can also be seen from an aeriel view here.


    CRACO (Italy): a fascinating medieval town



    Craco is located in the Region of Basilicata and the Province of Matera. About 25 miles inland from the Gulf of Taranto at the instep of the “boot” of Italy. This medieval town is typical of those in the area, built up with long undulating hills all around that allow for the farming of wheat and other crops. Craco can be dated back to 1060 when the land was in the ownership of Archbishop Arnaldo, Bishop of Tricarico. This long-standing relationshop with the Church had much influence over the inhabitants throughout the ages.





    In 1891, the population of Craco stood at well over 2,000 people. Though there had been many problems, with poor agricultural conditions creating desperate times. Between 1892 and 1922 over 1,300 people moved from the town to North America. Poor farming was added to by earthquakes, landslides, and War - all of which contributed to this mass migration. Between 1959 and 1972 Craco was plagued by these landslides and quakes. In 1963 the remaining 1,800 inhabitants were transferred to a nearby valley called Craco Peschiera, and the original Craco remains in a state of crumbling decay to this day.


    ORADOUR-SUR-GLANE (France): the horror of WWII



    The small village of Oradour-sur-Glane, France, is the setting of unspeakable horror. During World War II, 642 residents were massacred by German soldiers as punishment for the French Resistance. The Germans had initially intended to target nearby Oradour-sur-Vayres and mistakenly invaded Oradour-sur-Glane on June 10th 1944. According to a survivor’s account, the men were herded into barns where they were shot in the legs so they would die more slowly. The women and children, who had been held in a church, all perished when their attempt to escape was met by machine-gun fire. The village was razed by the Germans afterward. Its ruins still stand today as a memorial to the dead and a reminder of the events that took place.


    GUNKANJIMA (Japan): the forbidden island




    This island is one among 505 uninhabited islands in the Nagasaki Prefecture of Japan about 15 kilometers from Nagasaki itself. It is also known as "Gunkan-jima" or Battleship Island thanks to its high sea walls. It began in 1890 when a company called Mitsubishi bought the island and began a project to retrieve coal from the bottom of the sea. This attracted much attention, and in 1916 they were forced to build Japan’s first large concrete building on the island. A block of apartments that would both accommodate the seas of workers and protect them from hurricanes.





    In 1959, population had swelled, and boasted a density of 835 people per hectare for the whole island (1,391 per hectare for the residential district) - one of the highest population densities ever recorded worldwide. As petroleum replaced coal in Japan in the 1960’s, coal mines began shutting down all over the country, and Hashima’s mines were no exception. In 1974 Mitsubishi officially announced the closing of the mine, and today it is empty and bare, with travel currently prohibited. The island was the location for the 2003 film ‘Battle Royale II’ and inspired the final level of popular Asian videogame "Killer7".


    KADYKCHAN (Russia): memories of the Soviet Union



    Kadykchan was one of many small Russian cities that fell into ruin when the Soviet Union collapsed. Residents were forced to move to gain access to services like running water, schools and medical care. The state moved them out over a period of two weeks, and they were taken to other towns and provided with new housing. Once a tin mining town of 12,000 people, the city is now desolate. In their hurry to leave, residents left their belongings behind in their homes, so you can now find aging toys, books, clothing and other objects throughout the empty city.


    KOWLOON WALLED CITY (China): A lawless city



    The Kowloon Walled City was located just outside Hong Kong, China during British rule. A former watchpost to protect the area against pirates, it was occupied by Japan during World War II and subsequently taken over by squatters after Japan’s surrender. Neither Britain nor China wanted responsibility for it, so it became its own lawless city.



    Its population flourished for decades, with residents building labyrinthine corridors above the street level, which was clogged with trash. The buildings grew so tall that sunlight couldn’t reach the bottom levels and the entire city had to be illuminated with fluorescent lights. It was a place where brothels, casinos, opium dens, cocaine parlors, food courts serving dog meat and secret factories ran unmolested by authorities. It was finally torn down in 1993 after a mutual decision was made by British and Chinese authorities, who had finally grown wary of the unsanitary, anarchic city and its out-of-control population.


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    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 01-30-2009, 10:00 PM

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